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On Monday night, June 2nd 2003, the Computer History Museum officially opened its doors for the first time. The event was an historic occasion that celebrated the Computer History Museum's new location in Mountain View California.

Guests at the open house were able to witness the ribbon cutting ceremony that dedicated the museum and were then invited to tour the facility. The museum is still a work in progress, but visitors were able to wander through "Visible Storage," which is a nice way of saying the museum under construction. In reality, the available exhibits are very well placed, planned and documented. Of course the remaining 80+ percent of the museum's collection still needs to be un-boxed, cataloged and displayed, as appropriate.

As a volunteer, I was assigned the job of "Greeter" at the front door which kept me busy for most of the night. Fortunately I was able to get to the museum early to take the pictures below, all of which were hastily taken before or during the ribbon cutting.

The first thing visitors see upon entering visible storage is a veritable wall of PCs

The first thing visitors see upon entering visible storage is a veritable wall of PCs.

Here are a few very significant machines from the PC collection including a Sol 20, a Scelbi, an Altair and an SWTPC 6800

Here are a few very significant machines from the PC collection including a Sol 20, a Scelbi, an Altair and an SWTPC 6800.

Another batch of PCs on display

Another batch of PCs on display.

Part of the small machine/microcomputer exhibit was dedicated to some very nice home-brew systems

Part of the small machine/microcomputer exhibit was dedicated to some very nice home-brew systems.

Perhaps my favorite exhibit in the museum is one of the few remaining Apple I machines.  This one is in a simple wooden enclosure and signed by Steve Wozniac himself

Perhaps my favorite exhibit in the museum is one of the few remaining Apple I machines. This one is in a simple wooden enclosure and signed by Steve Wozniac himself.

I took a few

I took a few "panoramic" shots of the visible storage area showing many of the bigger computers and the basic layout of the room.

Some more Big Iron

Some more Big Iron.

Some more Big Iron

And more. . .

Some more Big Iron

And still more. . .

Many of the exhibits deal with particular technologies such as this exhibit area for Core Memory

Many of the exhibits deal with particular technologies such as this exhibit area for Core Memory.

And here is a

And here is a "wall" of core. More of a screen, really.

This display shows some difference engine parts and documents (middle shelf) as well as some Jacquard Loom cards, parts and information (top shelf)

This display shows some difference engine parts and documents (middle shelf) as well as some Jacquard Loom cards, parts and information (top shelf.)

What kind of party would it be without some food

What kind of party would it be without some food!

What kind of party would it be without some drink

And Drink!

Perhaps the oldest item on display were some Jetons or Reckoning Counters

Perhaps the oldest item on display were some Jetons or Reckoning Counters.

Easily the most impressive single machine on display is the one-of-a-kind Johniac

Easily the most impressive single machine on display is the one-of-a-kind Johniac.

An LGP-30 console with a teletype style terminal

An LGP-30 console with a teletype style terminal.

The Philco 212 is another impressive mainframe

The Philco 212 is another impressive mainframe.

The Sage is one of the most popular tube-era computers on display

The Sage is one of the most popular tube-era computers on display.

The WISC (Wisconsin Integrally Synchronized Computer) was another impressive tube-era machine.  Gene Amdahl, of IBM and then Amdahl Corporation, was a principal engineer

The WISC (Wisconsin Integrally Synchronized Computer) was another impressive tube-era machine. Gene Amdahl, of IBM and then Amdahl Corporation, was a principal engineer.

Although impressive looking, I don't think these scissors cut much

Although impressive looking, I don't think these scissors cut much.

The press were on hand to cover this historic event

The press were on hand to cover this historic event.

John Toole speaks at the ribbon-cutting ceremony

John Toole speaks at the ribbon-cutting ceremony.


(Submitted January 21, 2005 21:55:04 by Anthony)

Wow! Where is this place? Whens the next event! Sign me up!

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